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Drinking water quality samples

We regularly check the quality of the drinking water we supply to our customers by taking random samples and testing for certain chemicals and microorganisms.

At least weekly* At least monthly** At least quarterly At least annually***
  • Escherichia coli
  • chloroacetic acid
  • turbidity
  • electrical conductivity
  • pH
  • free chlorine
  • plate count 37ºC
  • coliforms
  • haloacetic acids
  • dichloroacetic acid
  • trichlororacetic acid
  • total trihalomethanes
  • aluminum (acid soluble)
  • bromate
  • formaldehyde
  • true colour#
  • magnesium#
  • calcium#
  • hardness#
  • iron#
  • manganese#
 
  • flouride

* Twice weekly for Ararat, Stawell and Horsham.

** Twice monthly for Ararat, Stawell and Horsham.

*** Twice weekly for towns with fluoride as treatment (Ararat, Natimuk and Horsham)

# Tested for but the results aren't currently available online

 

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Test Description:

Haloacetic acids are produced in drinking water as byproducts of the reaction between chlorine and naturally occurring humic and fulvic acids. The concentrations of Chloroacetic Acid in drinking water should not exceed 0.15 mg/L.

Haloacetic acids are produced in drinking water as byproducts of the reaction between chlorine and naturally occurring humic and fulvic acids. The concentrations of Chloroacetic Acid in drinking water should not exceed 0.15 mg/L.

Coliforms are gram-negative nonsporing rod-shaped bacteria, capable of aerobic and facultative anaerobic growth.They are found in large numbers in the faeces of humans and other warm-blooded animals.Coliforms are "indicator" organisms associated with bacteriologically polluted water.

Haloacetic acids are produced in drinking water as byproducts of the reaction between chlorine and naturally occurring humic and fulvic acids.  The concentrations of Dichloroacetic Acid in drinking water should not exceed 0.1 mg/L

Electrical conductivity of water is directly related to the concentration of dissolved ionized solids in the water. When correlated with laboratory TDS measurements, electrical conductivity provides an approximate value for the Total Dissolved Solids concentration

E. coli is the most common thermotolerant coliform present in faeces and is regarded as the most specific indicator of recent faecal contamination.  E. coli, (or thermotolerant coliforms) numbers can be determined using membrane filtration (MF) for concentration of the organisms from water.

Chlorine is also classified as a disinfectant, meaning that it is capable of killing bacteria, algae and other organic material instantly.When it is added to the water, it forms free available chlorine.Chlorine is also used to disinfect sewage and waste water, swimming pool water, in-plant supplies, and industrial cooling water.

pH is a measure of the hydrogen ion concentration of water.It is measured on a logarithmic scale from 0 to 14. A pH of 7 is neutral, greater than 7 is alkaline, and less than 7 is acidic.pH of drinking water should be between 6.5 and 8.5.

Haloacetic acids are produced in drinking water as byproducts of the reaction between chlorine and naturally occurring humic and fulvic acids. The concentrations of Trichloroacetic Acid in drinking water should not exceed 0.1 mg/L.

Trihalomethanes are present in drinking water principally as the result of disinfection using chlorination or, to a much lesser extent, chloramination. Chlorine, which produces hypochlorous acid when added to water, can react with naturally occurring organic material, such as humic and fulvic acids, to produce trihalomethanes.

Turbidity is caused by the presence in the water of fine suspended matter such as clay, silt, colloidal particles, plankton and other microscopic organisms.Turbidity is a measurement of the light scattering property of water, and the degree of scattering is dependent on the amount, size and composition of the suspended matter.Higher turbidity levels are often associated with higher levels of disease-causing microorganisms such as viruses, parasites and some bacteria.

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